Suicidal Thoughts?

Immediate Risk 

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts there are some resources listed below that may be supportive.

If someone’s life is in danger or there is an immediate risk of harm, call emergency services on 000

Additional Resources 

Suicide Call Back Service

Children and young adults from 5 - 25

Financial Counselling

Free counselling for suicide prevention & mental health via telephone on 1300 659 467, online & video for anyone affected by suicidal thoughts, 24/7 for more information visit their website here

Kids Helpline is Australia's only 24/7, private and confidential counselling service specifically for children and young people aged 5 to 25 years. You can contact them on 1800 55 1800 or visit their website here

Lifeline Central West offers financial counselling and gambling help counselling. To get in contact call 1300 798 258 or visit their website here

If you are concerned for your own safety or the safety of someone around you call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or visit their website here.

Lifeline

What can I do to help?

If you are concerned for the wellbeing of others below are some ways to support them. This information has been taken from the lifeline website and can be found here

When should I check in?

If someone you know is struggling to cope or having a difficult time, you might feel unsure of what to say or how to help. While checking in and asking if they are okay might seem like a difficult conversation to have, it could be a life-saving one.

Signs to look out for

It is important that you as a career, are aware of your own emotional wellbeing in order to assist others. It can sometimes be traumatic and very heavy supporting someone with suicidal thoughts. If you are finding that you can not stop thinking about the situation, having difficulty sleeping, mild depression or loss of apatite it is important that you get emotional support by seeing a counsellor or contacting your GP.

If you need immediate support yourself, you can also call Lifeline on 13 11 14 

Self-care for you as a supporter

It is important that you as a career, are aware of your own emotional wellbeing in order to assist others. It can sometimes be traumatic and very heavy supporting someone with suicidal thoughts. If you are finding that you can not stop thinking about the situation, having difficulty sleeping, mild depression or loss of apatite it is important that you get emotional support by seeing a counsellor or contacting your GP.

If you need immediate support yourself, you can also call Lifeline on 13 11 14 

Just a note

It is better to reach out than avoid the person for fear of getting the conversation wrong. Experts generally agree that asking someone whether they are thinking about suicide is unlikely to make the situation worse or ‘put ideas in their head’.

Three steps to support someone who is suicidal 

1. Ask

If you think someone might be suicidal, ask them directly "Are you thinking about suicide?" Don’t be afraid to do this, it shows you care and will actually decrease their risk because it shows someone is willing to talk about it. Make sure you ask directly and unambiguously if you feel able to do so. 

2. Listen and stay

If they say 'yes', they are suicidal, listen to them and allow them to express how they are feeling. Don’t leave them alone. Stay with them or get someone else reliable to stay with them.

3. Get help

Get them appropriate help. Call a crisis line like Lifeline 13 11 14 or 000 if life is in danger. If you can get in straight away, visit a GP or psychologist. Offer to make the appointment and accompany them if it is their wish. Even if the danger is not immediate they may need longer-term support for the issues that led to them feeling this way.